Tag Archives: Thailand

Thailand: The Attorney General ruled not to prosecute Lawyer June for not allowing police to search her car, due to her lack of intention to comply with the order

August 30, 2019

On 27 August 2019, Ms. Sirikan Charoensiri, known as Lawyer June, went to meet the inquiry officer who was responsible for her case at Chanasongkram Police Station, Bangkok, to hear the Attorney General’s order not to prosecute her on an allegation of concealing evidence.  The order was due to the fact that there was no intention to hide any evidence since she only complied to the recommendation from military court officers to keep the belongings of the alleged fellow activists by her side. Furthermore, the police made the request to search her car during the night and without providing any reasonable legal grounds.

For the other charge of not complying with an official order without reasonable grounds or explanation, the responsible prosecutor issued an order to dismiss the case due to be barred by prescription.  As a result, the criminal proceedings against lawyer Ms. Sirikan for two such allegations have been terminated.

Today the representatives from the embassies of Canada, Sweden, Germany, the United States, the European Union, and officials from human rights organizations including Amnesty International (Regional Office) came to observe the proceedings.

Detailed accounts of the final non-prosecution order and the termination of legal proceedings

On 26 July 2019, the office of the Special Prosecutor issued notification document No. 0013.3/1076 to Chanasongkram Police Station giving a final order not to prosecute and to terminate the proceedings against lawyer Sirikan.  In summary, the document provided the following details:

https://www.tlhr2014.com/?p=13569&fbclid=IwAR2axLGo0dJ6hVoAKljha8PXyM4dPEaDt6hge-6MF5rfK9pHF3a8XtcK4ao&lang=en

https://www.frontlinedefenders.org/en/case/judicial-harassment-against-sirikan-charoensiri

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirikan_Charoensiri

https://www.facebook.com/tlhr2014/

https://www.tlhr2014.com/?p=13465 (THAI)

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirikan_Charoensiri (FRANCAIS)

Thailand: Ensure truth, justice, and reparations for victims of enforced disappearance | Written Statement to the UN Human Rights Council

August 29, 2019

Image result for lawyers rights watch canada

Joint written statement* submitted by Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada, non-governmental organization in special consultative status, and Asian Legal Resource Centre, non-government organization in general consultative status

Thai Lawyers for Human Rights (TLHR), NGO without consultative status, also shares the views expressed in this statement.

Unforgotten in Thailand: Ensure truth, justice, and reparations for victims of enforced disappearance

  1. Introduction: Persistent impunity for enforced disappearances

 A pattern of impunity for enforced disappearances[1] persists in Thailand despite years of promises to ratify the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (UNCED)[2] and to pass legislation making enforced disappearance a crime.[3] The United Nations (UN) Working Group on Enforced and Involuntary Disappearances (WGEID) reports 82 unresolved cases of enforced disappearances since 1980.[4] This number represents a fraction of Thailand’s enforced disappearances since the 1950s,[5] as families and witnesses remain silent for fear of reprisals.[6] Those most vulnerable to enforced disappearances belong to minorities or indigenous peoples. Also at risk are human rights defenders (defenders) or peaceful government critics.[7]Thailand’s current laws foster impunity for enforced disappearance; when a body is not found, murder charges are not laid.[8] No public officials have ever been held accountable for suspected involvement in enforced disappearances. The persistent pattern of impunity for enforced disappearances constitutes a grave violation of Thailand’s obligations under customary international law and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) to which Thailand acceded in 1996.[9]

The risk of enforced disappearances is heightened by the practice of incommunicado detention of political opponents, suspects in national security cases, and suspected insurgents in southern provinces.[10]

Thailand: Ensure truth, justice, and reparations for victims of enforced disappearance | Written Statement to the UN Human Rights Council

https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/03/11/thai-lawyers-disappearance-unsolved-15-years

15 years since disappearance Somchai Neelapaijit

Thailand: at event marking 15th anniversary of the enforced disappearance of Somchai Neelapaijit, ICJ calls for effective measures to tackle the crime

https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/03/11/14-years-disappearance-thai-rights-lawyer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somchai_Neelapaijit

https://www.un.org/press/en/2019/sgsm19716.doc.htm

https://www.un.org/en/events/disappearancesday/

https://international.thenewslens.com/article/124112

https://www.thedailystar.net/frontpage/enforced-disappearance-in-bangladesh-thousand-days-wait-1792822

https://www.amnesty.org.uk/press-releases/syria-new-testimonies-families-disappeared-mark-day-disappeared

https://iran-hrm.com/index.php/2019/08/29/enforced-disappearances-in-iran-and-the-1988-massacre/

https://www.un.org/fr/events/disappearancesday/ (FRANCAIS)

enforced disappearances

Image result for international day of forced disappearances

Thailand: Three Thais accused of insulting king have disappeared – rights groups

May 10, 2019

Image result for Jatupat Boonpattaraksa

Three Thai activists facing charges of insulting the monarchy have disappeared after reportedly being arrested in Vietnam, rights groups said on Friday, months after two exiled critics of the military and monarchy turned up dead.

Thailand’s deputy prime minister, Prawit Wongsuwan, denied the three activists were in Thai custody, as has been reported by the Thai Alliance for Human Rights.

Chucheep Chiwasut, who broadcasts political commentary to Thailand from exile, and fellow activists Siam Theerawut and Kritsana Thapthai were reportedly turned over to Thai authorities by Vietnam on May 8, Human Rights Watch said in a statement.

“Vietnam’s alleged secret forced return to Thailand of three prominent activists should set off alarm bells in the international community,” Human Rights Watch Asia Director Brad Adams said.

London-based Amnesty International said Chucheep had long faced charges of lese majeste, or insulting the monarchy.

Siam and Kritsana were also under police investigation for lese majeste, the rights group said.

Article 112 of Thailand’s criminal code says anyone who insults the king, queen, heir or regent faces punishment of up to 15 years in prison.

Human rights groups have accused the ruling military of applying the lese majeste law more widely since a 2014 military coup as a way to silence critics.

Separately on Friday, a former law student was released from jail a month before the end of his two and half year sentence for a 2017 lese majeste conviction.

Jatupat Boonpattaraksa, an activist and critic of the ruling junta, was jailed for posting a profile of King Maha Vajiralongkorn published by the BBC’s Thai-language service that was deemed offensive.

His release was part of a royal amnesty for thousands of prisoners to mark the king’s May 4-6 coronation.

https://www.euronews.com/2019/05/10/three-thais-accused-of-insulting-king-have-disappeared-rights-groups

https://www.frontlinedefenders.org/en/case/ongoing-detention-jatupat-boonpattararaksa

Three Thai activists go missing after allegedly insulting king

http://www.news4europe.eu/6350_world/6125747_between-30-000-50-000-prisoners-to-be-freed-on-royal-pardon-in-thailand.html

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-thailand-king-insult/thai-activist-jailed-for-two-and-a-half-years-for-posting-bbc-article-idUSKCN1AV0YN

https://www.abc.es/internacional/abci-tailandia-aprueba-liberacion-entre-30000-0-50000-presos-carceles-201905100947_noticia.html (ESPANOL)

https://www.dnoticias.pt/mundo/milhares-de-presos-recebem-perdao-real-na-tailandia-EB4740446 (PORTUGUES)

Thailand: Thai Lawyer’s ‘Disappearance’ Unsolved 15 Years On

March 11, 2019

A sketch of Somchai Neelapaijit.

Fifteen years ago this week, I received a phone call in the middle of the night with the news that Somchai Neelapaijit had gone missing. At the time, Somchai was chair of Thailand’s Muslim Lawyers Association and vice-chair of the Human Rights Committee of the Lawyers Council of Thailand.

Official investigations have at least established that Somchai was abducted on March 12, 2004 and later murdered, though his body has never been found. His alleged assailants are a group of police officers who sought retaliation for Somchai’s involvement in lawsuits alleging widespread police torture of Muslim suspects in Thailand’s insurgency-ridden southern border provinces.

But over the past decade and a half, seven prime ministers, including current Prime Minister Gen. Prayut Chan-ocha, have failed to bring Somchai’s killers to justice.

A key reason is that Thailand’s penal code does not recognize enforced disappearance as a criminal offense. Without the body, prosecutors could only file charges of robbery and coercion against the five police officers implicated in the case. Their trial, hampered by official cover-ups, ended in their acquittal in December 2015.

Efforts by Somchai’s family to obtain justice have been hampered by a 2015 Supreme Court ruling that the family cannot act as a co-plaintiff, because there is no concrete evidence showing he is dead or otherwise incapable of bringing the case himself. The ruling placed the impossible burden on disappeared people of proving they had been disappeared.

https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/03/11/thai-lawyers-disappearance-unsolved-15-years

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/03/12/asia-pacific/15-years-activists-disappearance-bangkok-family-missing-thai-lawyer-still-waiting-justice/

https://lawyersforlawyers.org/en/rule-of-law-more-than-ever-under-pressure/

https://www.bangkokpost.com/opinion/opinion/1643044/impunity-remains-victims-obstacle-to-real-justice

https://www.evensi.com/15th-year-somchai-neelaphaijit-embassy-netherlands-bangkok/296162882

https://www.afad-online.org/news/10-statements/450-afad-remembers-and-demands-justice-for-thai-lawyer-somchai-neelapaijit-on-the-15-anniversary-of-this-disappearance

https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1089124-time-to-tackle-the-spectre-of-enforced-disappearance/?tab=comments#comment-13932288

https://lawyersforlawyers.org/en/15-years-since-disappearance-somchai-neelapaijit/?fbclid=IwAR0oB4Kn3h1gH9GryXAEPFbOpCTcn0bSOWgg25EUbS5tw8E2CODdQfVQwMI

Lawyers for Lawyers: Lawyers for Lawyers Award 2019

January 31, 2019

Nominate a lawyer for the Lawyers for Lawyers Award 2019! Nominations can be made until 1 March 2019, via our website: https://bit.ly/2RvKzOK

In 2017, Sirikan Charoensiri (‘June’) was presented with the Lawyers for Lawyers Award in Amsterdam. Watch her story here.

(Lawyers for Lawyers Facebook, 31/01/19)

https://lawyersforlawyers.org/en/nominate-now-for-the-l4l-award-2019/

https://lawyersforlawyers.org/en/about-us/lawyers-for-lawyers-awards/l4l-awards-nomination-form/

https://lawyersforlawyers.org/en/category/l4l-award/

https://lawyersforlawyers.org/

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30315819

Call for nominations for the L4L award 2019

 

Egypt/Thailand/France/Germany: Two persecuted rights lawyers receive Franco-German Prize for Human Rights

 

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, people standing and suit

Mohamed Lotfy (Egypt)

Sirikan June Charoensiri (Thailand)

https://www.tlhr2014.com/?p=10264&fbclid=IwAR3os1uhkSVzgQjDh28qfyZg3D9WHhz_5xIRyi-oyTxEqykAT03f9Ynk048

https://www.news24.com/Africa/News/egypt-court-orders-release-of-anti-sex-abuse-activist-20181219

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-46618153

https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/egypt-court-orders-release-activist-amal-fathy-49334365

https://www.frontlinedefenders.org/en/case/case-history-mohamed-lotfy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohamed_Lotfy_(Human_Rights_Defender)

https://www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/en/french-foreign-policy/human-rights/events/article/human-rights-franco-german-prize-for-human-rights-and-the-rule-of-law-21-11-18

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirikan_Charoensiri

https://afrique.lalibre.be/29342/egypte-la-justice-ordonne-la-liberation-dune-militante-des-droits-humains/ (FRANCAIS)

https://th.ambafrance.org/L-avocate-Sirikan-Charoensiri-recoit-le-prix-franco-allemand-pour-les-droits-de (FRANCAIS)

https://www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/fr/dossiers-pays/allemagne/relations-bilaterales/prix-franco-allemand-des-droits-de-l-homme-et-de-l-etat-de-droit/article/droits-de-l-homme-prix-franco-allemand-des-droits-de-l-homme-et-de-l-etat-de (FRANCAIS)

https://www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/fr/dossiers-pays/egypte/evenements/article/egypte-q-r-extrait-du-point-de-presse-16-01-19 (FRANCAIS)

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirikan_Charoensiri (ESPANOL)

Au cours d’une cérémonie chaleureuse qui s’est tenue le 18 décembre, les ambassadeurs d’Allemagne et de France en Égypte ont remis conjointement le Prix franco-allemand des droits de l’Homme et de l’État de droit à M. Mohamed Lotfy.

Ce prix, décerné cette année à 15 lauréats à travers le monde, récompense depuis 2016 des personnalités qui contribuent de façon exceptionnelle à la protection et à la promotion des droits de l’Homme et de l’État de droit dans leur pays et au niveau international.

Il témoigne de l’engagement constant de la France et de l’Allemagne en faveur des droits de l’Homme et de l’État de droit partout dans le monde et contribue à renforcer leur coopération dans ce domaine.

(Ambassade de France en Égypte Facebook, 18/12/18)

Sirikan Charoensiri, avocate thaïlandaise des droits de l’Homme au sein de l’organisation Thai Lawyers for Human Rights (TLHR), a reçu le mercredi 19 décembre au soir à la résidence de l’ambassadeur d’Allemagne le prix franco-allemand pour les droits de l’Homme et l’Etat de droit des mains de l’ambassadeur de France en Thaïlande, Jacques Lapouge, et de l’ambassadeur d’Allemagne, Georg Schmidt, en reconnaissance de son travail pour défendre les Thaïlandais affectés dans leurs droits depuis le coup d’Etat de mai 2014.

Pour en savoir plus ➡️ http://bit.ly/2LsehD1

🇹🇭 เมื่อค่ำวันพุธที่ 19 ธันวาคม 2561 ณ ทำเนียบเอกอัครราชทูตเยอรมนี นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ ทนายความของศูนย์ทนายความเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชน (Thai Lawyers for Human Rights – TLHR) ได้รับรางวัลสิทธิมนุษยชน และหลักนิติธรรมฝรั่งเศส-เยอรมัน จากนายฌัก ลาปูฌ เอกอัครราชทูตฝรั่งเศสประจำประเทศไทย และนายเกออร์ค ชมิดท์ เอกอัครราชทูตเยอรมนีประจำประเทศไทย เพื่อยกย่องการทำงานในการปกป้องชาวไทยที่ถูกละเมิดสิทธินับตั้งแต่เกิดรัฐประหารเมื่อเดือนพฤษภาคม 2557

ดูข้อมูลเพิ่มเติม ➡️ http://bit.ly/2PNkauV

(Ambassade de France en Thaïlande สถานเอกอัครราชทูตฝรั่งเศสประจำประเทศไทย Facebook, 20/12/18)

Lawyers for Lawyers: Lawyers Under Attack: Stories of Solidarity Among Legal Professionals

October 14, 2018

The connection between human rights and the independence of judges and lawyers is undeniable. As early as 1994, the Human Rights Commission (replaced by the Human Rights Council in 2006) noted with concern the growing attacks to the independence of lawyers and judges and decided to appoint a Special Rapporteur on this matter. As this problematic issue continued over the years and worsened in many countries, its mandate has been extended and continues nowadays. During the past year, Mr. Garcia-Sayan, current Special Rapporteur, has called for global attention regarding worrisome attacks against lawyers in China, Turkey and the Maldives and efforts by Governments to undermine judicial independence in Poland and the Philippines.

In order to learn more about this important topic we talked to “Lawyers for Lawyers” (L4L), an independent Dutch lawyers organization, which promotes and protects the independence of the legal profession through the support and empowerment of lawyers all over the world who face reprisals, improper interferences and restrictions because of their work, very often because they stood up for the human rights of their clients. Judith Lichtenberg and Sophie de Graaf (Executive Director and Policy &Programme Officer respectively at L4L) told us about the mission of L4L, problems faced by lawyers in the exercise of the legal profession nowadays and the work of L4L standing up for and supporting lawyers at risk.

Let us start from the beginning: where did the idea to found Lawyers 4 Lawyers come from?

Sophie de Graaf (SG): L4L is an independent non-profit organisation made up of lawyers, who promote common values of lawyers and their contribution to the justice system and the rule of law and stand up for colleagues who are hindered or threatened because of their work. The organisation has its roots in a solidarity campaign with Argentinean lawyers who disappeared or were detained without trial by the Military Junta during the years 1976 to 1983.

http://iravaban.net/en/203663.html?fbclid=IwAR2THAxtqmBvnDSDZAg_VtmXJv-Kge1_xaF4neOuJKWb-TSkctHu8Db3Ujk

https://lawyersforlawyers.org/

https://twitter.com/l4l_int?lang=en

http://iravaban.net/203215.html (ARMENIAN)

https://lawyersforlawyers.org/ (NEDERLANDS)