Tag Archives: Law Society of England & Wales

Turkey: Detention of 9 human rights defenders in Turkey – Law Society of England & Wales

September 21, 2017

LSG logo

On 12th September 2017, the Law Society sent an intervention letter to President Erdogan on the case of detention of 9 human rights defenders in Turkey.

In the letter, the Law Society expressed its concern over the ongoing detenion fo 9 human rights defenders who were remanded in custody on 6th June adn 5th July 2017. The Law Society had been informed that the detained have been charged with “aiding an armed terrorist organisation”.

Read the full letter below.

http://communities.lawsociety.org.uk/human-rights/interventions/2017/detention-of-9-human-rights-defenders-in-turkey/5062895.article

https://www.turkishminute.com/2017/09/22/detention-warrants-issued-for-44-including-lawyers-over-gulen-links/

Advertisements

Cameroon: Cameroon Letter – Law Society of England and Wales

September 21, 2017

 

LSG logo

On 21st September 2017, the Law Society sent an intervention letter on the ongoing case against lawyers in Cameroon.

Read the full letter below.

 

http://communities.lawsociety.org.uk/human-rights/interventions/2017/cameroon-letter/5062897.article

Cameroon/Turkey/Azerbaijan: UN side event “The independence of the legal profession”

April 5, 2017

DSC09996.png

On 16 March 2017 the Law Society, making use of its ECOSOC consultative status, organised a side event with Lawyers for Lawyers on “The independence of the legal profession” at the United Nations in Geneva.

The side event was held in the margins of the 34th Human Rights Council session and was co-sponsored by the Missions of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Paraguay and Australia.

Mr Diego García-Sayán, UN Special Rapporteur on the Independence of Judges and Lawyers, appointed in December 2016, was the keynote speaker. It was Mr García-Sayán’s first public speech in that capacity. He outlined the importance of the UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers and emphasised the principle that lawyers should be able to practise their profession independently, without fear of external interference and/or intimidation, and without being identified with their clients. Mr García-Sayán also highlighted some priority areas, which he would be exploring further during his mandate, such as corruption and the role played by non-state actors in undermining the rule of law and the independency of the judiciary.

Lawyers from Turkey, Cameroon and Azerbaijan also shared their experiences and extensively discussed the serious challenges facing the legal profession in their respective countries.

http://communities.lawsociety.org.uk/human-rights/news-and-events/un-side-event-the-independence-of-the-legal-profession/5061260.article